I start out everyday feeling fine but by night time I still feel a little light headed or headachy.     My husband said," I thought you were all better since you gave up salicylates." What people don't understand is you will always be Salicylate Intolerant and no matter how careful you are there are always hidden salicylates in the artificial colors, flavors and preservatives.     Also when you are feeling really good you have a tendency to cheat a little. Last night I was feeling good so I had Boston Market chicken, knowing they marinate it. ( I think with apple cider vinegar). Then I had a taste of the sweet potatos. I was good and had a can of plain string beans., Later that night I had a bowl of chocolate ice cream. A Big Bowl !  I felt a little dizzy when I went to bed, but thank God nothing like I used to get before I knew I was Salicylate Intolerant.     You have to be a detective everyday and analyze everything you eat.
 


Comments

Anthony
12/13/2010 14:08

I am finding the same thing. Trying to figure out what affects you is the hardest part. The real challenge is knowing that certain foods affect people differently. I am feeling much better by staying away from beverages with salicylates and junk food with all those colored dyes. I still have to work on my spices though. (Can't get away from cinnamon, especially at this time of the year) After a bad experience with a gingerbread muffin, however, I now know that the mixture of spices in gingerbread can cause me to break out and get very achy. All of my Salicylates are now coming from my dinners, which affect me late at night depending on the dosage. Toothpaste and mints are also somethings that I can't seem to stay away from. Even though I hate anything minty, I still cant get past the fact that it makes everything seem "fresh and clean" Still, mint has always given me headaches since I was a kid. (Mint and chocolate is disgusting by the way)

Reply
Dan
11/06/2011 19:09

Thanks for your blog. I'm going to try and get your book (low on funds).

But just wanted to let you know that both the Boston Market chicken and the chocolate ice cream probably had a LOT of 'hidden' chemicals in them besides a 'marinade'. No doubt loaded with MSG, benzoates, mutliple artificial colors and flavors....

Reply
Joan
11/22/2011 11:53

I,m sure you are right Dan. You know what I just discovered that is upsetting. Hershey chocolates are all made with vanillin instead of vanilla.

Reply
Susan
04/29/2012 15:48

It sounds like you also might have an intolerance to amines.

I am salicylate intolerant AND amine intolerant. Often those two do go hand in hand. I worked with a nutritionist who specializes in intolerances, did the Elimination Diet and found I was intolerant to both salicylates and amines.

Chocolate is high in amines, as is any fermented or preserved foods like cheeses, beer, wine, etc.

I'm very new to this so I suggest doing an online search. But just like with salicylates, there's a lot of misinformation out there.

Good luck!

Reply
Joan Ablahani
05/04/2012 08:39

Hi Sue, you're probably right. I am very aware of amines and have felt sick many times in the past from eating leftovers. I hate to cook everynight and we often eat leftover chicken, beef, whatever. The fact that I can get away with it sometimes, and can eat a piece of chocolate with no symptoms gives me a false sense of security. Well take care, Joan

Reply
cindy
10/03/2012 14:09

I have allergies to EVERYTHING and I mean EVERYTHING. My allergist finally said I cant help you,you need to explore alternative treatments. I found AAT (alternative allergy treatment? This is done with brain wave activity. Yes, it sounds weird but WHAT do you have to lose at this point??I just had treatment for Salicylates and I should be better by tomorrow. I know crazy but we have done. dogs and cats (no longer allergic) Molds, dust, and all sorts of things. Now we are down to parts of foods and Salicylates were a huge red flag. I will let you know. If intersted, email me. Cindy

Reply
Joan
10/13/2012 17:15

Good luck Cindy. I would love to know if it works. Joan

Reply
Erika Rohde
10/22/2013 16:55

Hi Cindy, would love to know more about this therapy with brain wave activity. Could you let me know more? Thanks so much

Erika

Reply
Joaner
11/27/2013 15:27

Hey,

In January of 2012, I had shortness of breath. I went to the hospital and was told it was just anxiety. In November of 2012, I went back again - this time they did a d-dimer, EKG and chest ultrasound. It ended up I had a massive pulmonay embolism. Since then, I have recovered from it. My heart is good and lungs are perfect - show no damage.

This past summer I developed a shortness of breath again. It lasted for about two weeks and I went back to hospital as I thought blood clots were back. They weren't. I had all the tests and no clots...but still trouble breathing.

It is now November and I am short of breath again. I am actually at the hospital right now. I have started thinking about my shortness of breath and realized when it happens - started making a food diary - noticed that when I had yeast, chocolate, gum, bananas, mints and the kicker aspirin. You see, I never had this prob when I took blood thinners as I had to stay away from aspirin and Nsaids. On Monday, Nov 18, I saw my specialist and he wanted me to go on aspirin as a preventative.

I am thinking that salicylates have definitely something to do with my shortness of breath. I also think there could be a problem with amines. I had one aspirin on Monday. I got short of breath after eating a cranberry muffin on Thursday.

I guess I just want your opinion. Also, what did your shortness feel like? I don't really wheeze or have phlegm. My lungs feel constricted and tight, but you cannot hear them wheeze.

Thanks for any comments!

Reply
Joan
12/03/2013 19:07

Hi Joaner. I suffered from shortness of breath for years. When my father died in the hospital I was very short of breath. Right after we got the devastating news I ended up in the emergency room with my Mom and uncle at my side. After an hour of waiting I told my Mom that I wanted to leave. WE thought it was anxiety. I used to walk with my girlfriends in the fall and would get very short of breath. I thought it was a n allergy to mold There was always a reason. There was no wheezing or phlegm, just a tight feeling in my chest where I cant draw a full breath in. I know now that it was from eating salicylates. I still get it from time to time if I cheat.
My father had Angina. Shortness of breath and mild chest pains after he ate. You know what I'm getting at. Perhaps he actually was SS and was reacting to eating foods high in sals.
I would be very careful about starting an aspirin regimen. I would definitely go off all sals that are moderate to very high for 2 weeks and see how you feel. Good luck, Joan

Reply
Joaner
12/04/2013 19:17

Yes, it feels tight and like you just cannot catch your breath...sometimes, you try to yawn just to get a satisfying breath. I guess that is the best way to describe it....that you cannot get a full, satisfying breath that feels right. Has anyone else had this, as well?

Are there any natural cures or things to try to get rid of the salicylates faster? I have heard that molybedum (sp) and epsom salts might work.

Also wondering about salicylates in chocolate.

Anyway, I just purchased the book on my kindle!

Reply
Joaner
12/04/2013 19:18

Yes, it feels tight and like you just cannot catch your breath...sometimes, you try to yawn just to get a satisfying breath. I guess that is the best way to describe it....that you cannot get a full, satisfying breath that feels right. Has anyone else had this, as well?

Are there any natural cures or things to try to get rid of the salicylates faster? I have heard that molybedum (sp) and epsom salts might work.

Also wondering about salicylates in chocolate.

Anyway, I just purchased the book on my kindle!

Reply



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    Author

    Hi, I am married, with two boys and a Sheltie. I have been Salicylate Intolerant my  whole life but I hit bottom about 3 yrs. ago as I started eating healthier.  Since then,I have been reading everything I possibly can about Salicylate Intolerance but feel that a Blog is the best way for each of us to learn and feel connected to others. I welcome your Questions, your answers, your comments  and your support. Thanks, Joan Ablahani



















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